Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Mock Sibert’ Category

Thank you for reading along with us. We have upgraded our Allen County Public Library Web site and our future blog posts can be found here.

new blog

 

http://www.acpl.lib.in.us/home/explore/acpl-kids/one-books-two-books

Read Full Post »

Do you have a future scientist in your house?

“Scientists in the Field” is your chance to meet some rockstars of the scientific community.  Each book features the men and women who are at the forefront of developing cutting edge technologies  and increasing our understanding of the natural world.   These scientists are the ones exploring caves, wading in mucky swamps,  climbing mountains, and cuddling an endangered animal.

This informative and exciting series has been recognized as outstanding nonfiction for kids: winning a  Sibert Medal, and four (!!!!) Sibert honors.

   
 
   

Read Full Post »

Who changes the world?   Someone who believes they can!

Share these true stories of women full of big dreams and even bigger spirits who challenged to system to make a change with the girls (and boys!) in your life who need to know that anything is possible.

And in case YOU (out there on the great, big internet world) need some inspiration today, here are some great bits from these powerful books:

“So why did she become the first woman doctor?  Because one person believed she coulde blackwell and told Elizabeth she was just the kind of smart, determined girl who could change the world.”  from Who Says Women Can’t Be Doctors? The Story of Elizabeth Blackwell by Tanya Lee Stone; Illustrated by Marjorie Priceman

brave girl

“…in America, wrongs can be righted, warriors can wear skirts and blouses, and the bravest hearts may beat in girls only five feet tall.”  from Brave Girl: Clara and the Shirtwaist Maker’s Strike of 1909 by Michelle Markel; Pictures by Melissa Sweet

“Henrielooktta smiled.  Her mind roamed.  She dreamed.  She whispered to herself again.  How high? How high is the sky?” from Look Up! Henrietta Leavitt, Pioneering Woman Astronomer by Robert Burleigh; Illustrated by Raul Colon

mary walker

“The nation was at war.  This was no time to worry about skirts getting dirty.  Many wounded soldier had been brought to Washington…She was going to help them.” from Mary Walker Wears the Pants: the True Story of the Doctor, Reformer, and Civil War Hero by Cheryl Harness; Illustrated by Carlo Molinari

Read Full Post »

Today the American Library Association announced the winners for a variety of book awards.  We’ve devoted a good deal of this blog in the past year to talking about new books and which ones we think will win awards.  Without further ado here is the list of winning books and honor books:

Randolph Caldecott Medal WinnerThis is Not My Hat written and illustrated by Jon KlassenThis is not my hat
space Honor Books: Extra Yarn written by Mac Barnett and illustrated by Jon Klassen, Green written and illustrated by Laura Vaccaro Seeger, Creepy Carrots written by Aaron Reynolds and illustrated by Peter Brown, and One Cool Friend written by Toni Buzzeo and illustrated by David Small

John Newbery Medal Winner –  The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate
space Honor Books: Splendors and Glooms written by Laura Amy Schlitz, Bomb: The Race to Build—and Steal—the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon by Steve Sheinkin, Three Times Lucky by Sheila Turnage One and only ivan

Coretta Scott King Author Award WinnerHand in Hand: Ten Black Men Who Changed America written by Andrea Davis Pinkney and illustrated by Brian Pinkney
space Honor Books: Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson and illustrated by E. B. Lewis, No Crystal Stair: A Documentary Novel of the Life and Work of Lewis Michaux, Harlem Bookseller written by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson and illustrated by R. Gregory Christie

Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award Winner –  I, Too, Am America written by Langston Hughes and illustrated by Bryan CollierI, Too, Am America, illustrated by Bryan Collier
blank Honor Books: H. O. R. S. E. illustrated and written by Christopher Myers, Ellen’s Broom written by Kelly Starling Lyons and illustrated by Daniel Minter, and I Have a Dream: Martin Luther King, Jr. written by Martin Luther King, Jr. and illustrated by Kadir Nelson

Theodor Seuss Geisel Award Winner – Up, Tall and High written and illustrated by Ethan Long
space Honor Books: Let’s Go for a Drive! written and illustrated by Mo Willems, Pete the Cat and His Four Groovy Buttons written by Eric Litwin and illustrated by James Dean, and Rabbit & Robot: The Sleepover written and illustrated by Cece Bell

Robert F. Sibert Informational Book AwardBomb: The Race to Build—and Steal—the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon written by Steve Sheinkin
space Honor Books: Electric Ben: The Amazing Life and Times of Benjamin Franklin written and illustrated by Robert Byrd, Moonbird: A Year on the Wind with the Great Survivor B95 written by Phillip M. Hoose, and Titanic: Voices from the Disaster written by Deborah Hopkinson

You can find more book award winners if you click here.

Read Full Post »

times One Times Square by Joe McKendry One Times Square explores the story of this fascinating intersection, starting when Broadway was a mere dirt path known as Bloomingdale Road, through the district’s decades of postwar decay, to its renewal as a glittering, tourist-friendly media mecca.

Every January, the American Library Association presents an award to the author and illustrator of “most distinguished informational book”– the Sibert Medal. And every year, we like to seek out books that meet the criteria for this award.

On Monday evenings, look for posts on this blog that highlight some of the newly published children’s & YA books we’ve discovered . If you have thoughts to share about any of the books or have a title to suggest, please feel free to do so in the comments field.

Read Full Post »

good mountain From the Good Mountain: How Gutenberg Changed the World by James Rumford What was made of rags and bones, soot and seeds? What took a mountain to make? For the answer, travel back to the fifteenth century – to a time when books were made by hand and a man named Johannes Gutenberg invented a way to print books with movable type.

Every January, the American Library Association presents an award to the author and illustrator of “most distinguished informational book”– the Sibert Medal. And every year, we like to seek out books that meet the criteria for this award.

On Monday evenings, look for posts on this blog that highlight some of the newly published children’s & YA books we’ve discovered . If you have thoughts to share about any of the books or have a title to suggest, please feel free to do so in the comments field.

Read Full Post »

Marching to the Mountaintop: How Poverty, Labor Fights, and Covil Rights Set the Stage for Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Final Hours by Ann Bausum Explores how the media, politics, the civil rights movement, and labor protests all converged to set the scene for one of Dr. King’s greatest speeches and for his tragic death on April 4, 1968, in Memphis.
 

Ice! The Amazing History of the Ice Business by Laurence Pringle In the early 1800s, people began to harvest ice, store it in ways that limited melting, and transport it to homes and businesses. Eventually, almost everyone had an icebox, and a huge, vital ice business grew.  Pringle worked closely with experts and relied on primary documents, including archival photographs, postcards, prints, and drawings, to capture the times when everyone waited for the ice man and his wagon to deliver those precious blocks of ice.

Every January, the American Library Association presents an award to the author and illustrator of “most distinguished informational book”– the Sibert Medal. And every year, we like to seek out books that meet the criteria for this award.

On Monday evenings, look for posts on this blog that highlight some of the newly published children’s & YA books we’ve discovered . If you have thoughts to share about any of the books or have a title to suggest, please feel free to do so in the comments field.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: