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Posts Tagged ‘2013 Mock Coretta Scott King’

Necklace.JPGEvery time I take a group of children and parents through the Main Library on a tour, I say the same thing to them while I show them the picture book area.  “Remember,” I say, “that picture books are not just for little kids.  I like to read them, and lots of them are written for older kids.  Don’t stop visiting this section of the library when you learn to read chapter books!”

This new book is a great example.  I would read it to an eight or nine-year-old, to my five-year-old granddaughters, or even to a group of adults interested in genealogy.  (We see quite a few adults like that here at the Allen County Public Library.)

In The Granddaughter Necklace, Sharon is about to pass on to her daughter Georgia, the necklace worn by generations of females in her family.  She tells the story of each, back as far as she knows, when Francis wore the necklace on the ship to America from Ireland.

Read about the inspiration for the story in the author’s note at the back of the book.  It’s not a true story, but it was inspired by the history of the author’s family and by her search for that history.  It’s an almost-true story, like most good stories are.

Read here about this African-American author’s life and about some of the more than fifty children’s books she’s written.

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Included in the awards presented annually to children’s books’ authors and illustrators are the Coretta Scott King Book Awards. They are given to African American authors and illustrators for “outstanding inspirational and educational contributions” which “promote understanding and appreciation of the culture of all peoples and their contribution to the realization of the American dream of a pluralistic society.” You can find a list of past winners here, on the American Library Association website.

This book fits the qualifications and could, in 2013, be on the list of winners. Find our other “nominees” here. If you read an additional new book that you feel is qualified for a Coretta Scott King award, please email so that we may include it in our list. If you have read these titles and want to comment, please do so below. We’d love to hear from you!

fifty cents Fifty Cents and a Dream : Young Booker T. Washington,
by Jabari Asim; illustrated by Bryan Collier
Summary: “Born into slavery, young Booker T. Washington could only dream of learning to read and write. After emancipation, Booker began a five-hundred-mile journey, mostly on foot, to Hampton Institute, taking his first of many steps towards a college degree. When he arrived, he had just fifty cents in his pocket and a dream about to come true.”–book flap

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Included in the awards presented annually to children’s books’ authors and illustrators are the Coretta Scott King Book Awards. They are given to African American authors and illustrators for “outstanding inspirational and educational contributions” which “promote understanding and appreciation of the culture of all peoples and their contribution to the realization of the American dream of a pluralistic society.” You can find a list of past winners here, on the American Library Association website.

This book fits the qualifications and could, in 2013, be on the list of winners. Find our other “nominees” here. If you read an additional new book that you feel is qualified for a Coretta Scott King award, please email so that we may include it in our list. If you have read these titles and want to comment, please do so below. We’d love to hear from you!

Discovering Black America Discovering Black America: from the age of exploration to the twenty-first century
by Linda Tarrant-Reid
Summary: An unprecedented account of more than 400 years of African-American history set against a background of American and global events. The book includes first-person narratives drawn from diaries, written oral accounts, autobiographies, and interviews.

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Included in the awards presented annually to children’s books’ authors and illustrators are the Coretta Scott King Book Awards. They are given to African American authors and illustrators for “outstanding inspirational and educational contributions” which “promote understanding and appreciation of the culture of all peoples and their contribution to the realization of the American dream of a pluralistic society.” You can find a list of past winners here, on the American Library Association website.

This book fits the qualifications and could, in 2013, be on the list of winners. Find our other “nominees” here. If you read an additional new book that you feel is qualified for a Coretta Scott King award, please email so that we may include it in our list. If you have read these titles and want to comment, please do so below. We’d love to hear from you!

Hand in Hand Hand in Hand, Ten Black Men Who Changed America
by Andrea Davis Pinkney, Illustrated by Brian J. Pinkney
Summary: “Hand in Hand” presents the stories of 10 men from different eras in American history, organized chronologically to provide a scope from slavery to the modern day. Men profiled include Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Barack H. Obama II.

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Included in the awards presented annually to children’s books’ authors and illustrators are the Coretta Scott King Book Awards. They are given to African American authors and illustrators for “outstanding inspirational and educational contributions” which “promote understanding and appreciation of the culture of all peoples and their contribution to the realization of the American dream of a pluralistic society.” You can find a list of past winners here, on the American Library Association website.

This book fits the qualifications and could, in 2013, be on the list of winners. Find our other “nominees” here. If you read an additional new book that you feel is qualified for a Coretta Scott King award, please email so that we may include it in our list. If you have read these titles and want to comment, please do so below. We’d love to hear from you!

Discovering Wes Moore Discovering Wes Moore
by Wes Moore
Summary: The author, a Rhodes scholar and combat veteran, analyzes factors that influenced him as well as another man of the name and from the same neighborhood who was drawn into a life of drugs and crime and ended up serving life in prison, focusing on the influence of relatives, mentors, and social expectations that could have led either of them on different paths.

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Included in the awards presented annually to children’s books’ authors and illustrators are the Coretta Scott King Book Awards. They are given to African American authors and illustrators for “outstanding inspirational and educational contributions” which “promote understanding and appreciation of the culture of all peoples and their contribution to the realization of the American dream of a pluralistic society.” You can find a list of past winners here, on the American Library Association website.

This book fits the qualifications and could, in 2013, be on the list of winners. Find our other “nominees” here. If you read an additional new book that you feel is qualified for a Coretta Scott King award, please email so that we may include it in our list. If you have read these titles and want to comment, please do so below. We’d love to hear from you!

Harlem's Little Blackbird Harlem’s Little Blackbird: the Story of florence Mills
by Renee Watson;
Christian Robinson, illustrator
Summary: Zora and Langston. Billie and Bessie. Eubie and Duke. If the Harlem Renaissance had a court, they were its kings and queens. But there were other, lesser known individuals whose contributions were just as impactful, such as Florence Mills. Born to parents who were former-slaves Florence knew early on that she loved to sing. And that people really responded to her sweet, bird-like voice. Her dancing and singing catapulted her all the way to the stages of 1920s Broadway where she inspired songs and even entire plays! Yet with all this success, she knew firsthand how bigotry shaped her world. And when she was offered the role of a lifetime from Ziegfeld himself, she chose to support all-black musicals instead.

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Included in the awards presented annually to children’s books’ authors and illustrators are the Coretta Scott King Book Awards.  They are given to African American authors and illustrators for “outstanding inspirational and educational contributions” which “promote understanding and appreciation of the culture of all peoples and their contribution to the realization of the American dream of a pluralistic society.” You can find a list of past winners here, on the American Library Association website.

This book fits the qualifications and could, in 2013, be on the list of winners. Find our other “nominees” here.  If you read an additional new book that you feel is qualified for a Coretta Scott King award, please email so that we may include it in our list.  If you have read these titles and want to comment, please do so below.  We’d love to hear from you!

No Crystal Stair : a documentary novel of the life and work of Lewis Michaux, Harlem bookseller
Vaunda Micheaux Nelson, author;
R. Gregory Christie, illustrator
Summary:  Documentary sounds like it could be boring, but you won’t find a boring word here. In this work of historical fiction, Nelson tells the story of a man with a passion for knowledge and of a bookstore whose influence has become legendary. (Grade 7 and up)

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