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Archive for the ‘2013 Mock Sibert List’ Category

Do you have a future scientist in your house?

“Scientists in the Field” is your chance to meet some rockstars of the scientific community.  Each book features the men and women who are at the forefront of developing cutting edge technologies  and increasing our understanding of the natural world.   These scientists are the ones exploring caves, wading in mucky swamps,  climbing mountains, and cuddling an endangered animal.

This informative and exciting series has been recognized as outstanding nonfiction for kids: winning a  Sibert Medal, and four (!!!!) Sibert honors.

   
 
   

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Who changes the world?   Someone who believes they can!

Share these true stories of women full of big dreams and even bigger spirits who challenged to system to make a change with the girls (and boys!) in your life who need to know that anything is possible.

And in case YOU (out there on the great, big internet world) need some inspiration today, here are some great bits from these powerful books:

“So why did she become the first woman doctor?  Because one person believed she coulde blackwell and told Elizabeth she was just the kind of smart, determined girl who could change the world.”  from Who Says Women Can’t Be Doctors? The Story of Elizabeth Blackwell by Tanya Lee Stone; Illustrated by Marjorie Priceman

brave girl

“…in America, wrongs can be righted, warriors can wear skirts and blouses, and the bravest hearts may beat in girls only five feet tall.”  from Brave Girl: Clara and the Shirtwaist Maker’s Strike of 1909 by Michelle Markel; Pictures by Melissa Sweet

“Henrielooktta smiled.  Her mind roamed.  She dreamed.  She whispered to herself again.  How high? How high is the sky?” from Look Up! Henrietta Leavitt, Pioneering Woman Astronomer by Robert Burleigh; Illustrated by Raul Colon

mary walker

“The nation was at war.  This was no time to worry about skirts getting dirty.  Many wounded soldier had been brought to Washington…She was going to help them.” from Mary Walker Wears the Pants: the True Story of the Doctor, Reformer, and Civil War Hero by Cheryl Harness; Illustrated by Carlo Molinari

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times One Times Square by Joe McKendry One Times Square explores the story of this fascinating intersection, starting when Broadway was a mere dirt path known as Bloomingdale Road, through the district’s decades of postwar decay, to its renewal as a glittering, tourist-friendly media mecca.

Every January, the American Library Association presents an award to the author and illustrator of “most distinguished informational book”– the Sibert Medal. And every year, we like to seek out books that meet the criteria for this award.

On Monday evenings, look for posts on this blog that highlight some of the newly published children’s & YA books we’ve discovered . If you have thoughts to share about any of the books or have a title to suggest, please feel free to do so in the comments field.

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good mountain From the Good Mountain: How Gutenberg Changed the World by James Rumford What was made of rags and bones, soot and seeds? What took a mountain to make? For the answer, travel back to the fifteenth century – to a time when books were made by hand and a man named Johannes Gutenberg invented a way to print books with movable type.

Every January, the American Library Association presents an award to the author and illustrator of “most distinguished informational book”– the Sibert Medal. And every year, we like to seek out books that meet the criteria for this award.

On Monday evenings, look for posts on this blog that highlight some of the newly published children’s & YA books we’ve discovered . If you have thoughts to share about any of the books or have a title to suggest, please feel free to do so in the comments field.

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Marching to the Mountaintop: How Poverty, Labor Fights, and Covil Rights Set the Stage for Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Final Hours by Ann Bausum Explores how the media, politics, the civil rights movement, and labor protests all converged to set the scene for one of Dr. King’s greatest speeches and for his tragic death on April 4, 1968, in Memphis.
 

Ice! The Amazing History of the Ice Business by Laurence Pringle In the early 1800s, people began to harvest ice, store it in ways that limited melting, and transport it to homes and businesses. Eventually, almost everyone had an icebox, and a huge, vital ice business grew.  Pringle worked closely with experts and relied on primary documents, including archival photographs, postcards, prints, and drawings, to capture the times when everyone waited for the ice man and his wagon to deliver those precious blocks of ice.

Every January, the American Library Association presents an award to the author and illustrator of “most distinguished informational book”– the Sibert Medal. And every year, we like to seek out books that meet the criteria for this award.

On Monday evenings, look for posts on this blog that highlight some of the newly published children’s & YA books we’ve discovered . If you have thoughts to share about any of the books or have a title to suggest, please feel free to do so in the comments field.

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  George Bellows: Painter With a Punch by Robert Burleigh Having spent most of his adult life in New York City, Bellows left behind an extraordinary body of work that captures life in this dynamic city: bustling street scenes, ringside views of boxing matches, and boys diving and swimming in the East River.
  The Bronte Sisters: The Brief Lives of Charlotte, Emily and Anne by Catherine Reef The Brontë sisters are among the most beloved writers of all time, best known for their classic nineteenth-century novels Jane Eyre (Charlotte), Wuthering Heights (Emily), and Agnes Grey (Anne). This biography explores the turbulent lives of these literary siblings and the oppressive times in which they lived.

Every January, the American Library Association presents an award to the author and illustrator of “most distinguished informational book”– the Sibert Medal. And every year, we like to seek out books that meet the criteria for this award.

On Monday evenings, look for posts on this blog that highlight some of the newly published children’s & YA books we’ve discovered . If you have thoughts to share about any of the books or have a title to suggest, please feel free to do so in the comments field.

Read Full Post »

  Noah Webster and his Words by Jeri Chase Ferris; Illustrated by Vincent X. Kirsch Webster’s American Dictionary is the second most popular book ever printed in English. But who was that Webster? Noah Websterwas a bookish Connecticut farm boy who became obsessed with uniting America through language.
  Bomb! The Race to Build–and Steal!–the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon by Steve SheinkinThis is the story of the plotting, the risk-taking, the deceit, and genius that created the world’s most formidable weapon. This is the story of the atomic bomb.

Every January, the American Library Association presents an award to the author and illustrator of “most distinguished informational book”– the Sibert Medal. And every year, we like to seek out books that meet the criteria for this award.

On Monday evenings, look for posts on this blog that highlight some of the newly published children’s & YA books we’ve discovered . If you have thoughts to share about any of the books or have a title to suggest, please feel free to do so in the comments field.

Read Full Post »

  The Giant and How He Humbugged America by Jim Murphy When a ten-foot-tall purported “petrified man” is unearthed from a backyard in upstate New York in 1869, the discovery immediately turns into a spectacle of epic proportions. News of the giant spreads like wildfire, and well over a thousand people come to view him in the first five days alone!
Island: A Story of the Galapagos by Jason Chin Charles Darwin first visited the Galápagos Islands almost 200 years ago, only to discover a land filled with plants and animals that could not be found anywhere else on earth. How did they come to inhabit the island? How long will they remain?

Every January, the American Library Association presents an award to the author and illustrator of “most distinguished informational book”– the Sibert Medal. And every year, we like to seek out books that meet the criteria for this award.

On Monday evenings, look for posts on this blog that highlight some of the newly published children’s & YA books we’ve discovered . If you have thoughts to share about any of the books or have a title to suggest, please feel free to do so in the comments field.

Read Full Post »

  Zora!: The Life of Zora Neale Hurston by Dennis Brindell Fradin and Judith Bloom Fradin Zora Neale Hurston was confident, charismatic, and determined to be extraordinary.  Zora often found herself in abject poverty. Through it all, Zora kept writing. And though none of her books sold more than a thousand copies while she was alive, she was rediscovered a decade later by a new generation of readers, who knew they had found an important voice of American Literature.

Every January, the American Library Association presents an award to the author and illustrator of “most distinguished informational book”– the Sibert Medal. And every year, we like to seek out books that meet the criteria for this award.

On Monday evenings, look for posts on this blog that highlight some of the newly published children’s & YA books we’ve discovered . If you have thoughts to share about any of the books or have a title to suggest, please feel free to do so in the comments field.

Read Full Post »

Paiute Princess: The Story of Sarah Winnemucca  by Deborah Kogan Ray Born into the Northern Paiute tribe of Nevada in 1844, Sarah Winnemucca straddled two cultures: the traditional life of her people, and the modern ways of her grandfather’s white friends. Sarah was smart and good at languages, so she was able to link the worlds. As she became older, this made her a great leader.
  Monsieur Marceau: Actor Without Words by Leda Schubert; Illustrations by Gerard Dubios  Marcel Marceau, the world’s most famous mime, enthralled audiences around the world for more than fifty years. When he waved his hand or lifted his eyebrow he was able to speak volumes without ever saying a word.

Every January, the American Library Association presents an award to the author and illustrator of “most distinguished informational book”– the Sibert Medal. And every year, we like to seek out books that meet the criteria for this award.

On Monday evenings, look for posts on this blog that highlight some of the newly published children’s & YA books we’ve discovered . If you have thoughts to share about any of the books or have a title to suggest, please feel free to do so in the comments field.

Read Full Post »

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