Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Mock Coretta Scott King’ Category

Nelson MandelaNelson Mandela grew up in South Africa.  He was one of the Xhosa people who had lived peacefully in the bountiful mountains and valleys until “their land was taken and their spirits dimmed” by people from Europe.  His father died when he was only nine years old and when he was 13 he went far away to the city of Johannesburg to attend school.  He became a lawyer and defended people who could not defend themselves.  He and others protested a cruel policy created by the government called apartheid.  “It split the people into three–African, Indian, European.”  Mandela wanted one South Africa, where everyone could enjoy freedom like that in neighboring countries.

He was arrested for his belief that things could be different and improved and he was sent to live in a bleak prison on Robben Island for many, many years. His children grew up without him.  People continued to protest. Finally the government agreed to change. “Apartheid was no more.  Nelson was an old man . . . at last set free.”

The people of South Africa elected him president.  He represents hope to many people.

Kadir Nelson has written a wonderful biography of Nelson Mandela.  His art and words represent without flaw the struggle and the hope of Nelson Mandela’s life .  Don’t miss out — check out this book!

Read Full Post »

Necklace.JPGEvery time I take a group of children and parents through the Main Library on a tour, I say the same thing to them while I show them the picture book area.  “Remember,” I say, “that picture books are not just for little kids.  I like to read them, and lots of them are written for older kids.  Don’t stop visiting this section of the library when you learn to read chapter books!”

This new book is a great example.  I would read it to an eight or nine-year-old, to my five-year-old granddaughters, or even to a group of adults interested in genealogy.  (We see quite a few adults like that here at the Allen County Public Library.)

In The Granddaughter Necklace, Sharon is about to pass on to her daughter Georgia, the necklace worn by generations of females in her family.  She tells the story of each, back as far as she knows, when Francis wore the necklace on the ship to America from Ireland.

Read about the inspiration for the story in the author’s note at the back of the book.  It’s not a true story, but it was inspired by the history of the author’s family and by her search for that history.  It’s an almost-true story, like most good stories are.

Read here about this African-American author’s life and about some of the more than fifty children’s books she’s written.

Read Full Post »

Today the American Library Association announced the winners for a variety of book awards.  We’ve devoted a good deal of this blog in the past year to talking about new books and which ones we think will win awards.  Without further ado here is the list of winning books and honor books:

Randolph Caldecott Medal WinnerThis is Not My Hat written and illustrated by Jon KlassenThis is not my hat
space Honor Books: Extra Yarn written by Mac Barnett and illustrated by Jon Klassen, Green written and illustrated by Laura Vaccaro Seeger, Creepy Carrots written by Aaron Reynolds and illustrated by Peter Brown, and One Cool Friend written by Toni Buzzeo and illustrated by David Small

John Newbery Medal WinnerThe One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate
space Honor Books: Splendors and Glooms written by Laura Amy Schlitz, Bomb: The Race to Build—and Steal—the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon by Steve Sheinkin, Three Times Lucky by Sheila Turnage One and only ivan

Coretta Scott King Author Award WinnerHand in Hand: Ten Black Men Who Changed America written by Andrea Davis Pinkney and illustrated by Brian Pinkney
space Honor Books: Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson and illustrated by E. B. Lewis, No Crystal Stair: A Documentary Novel of the Life and Work of Lewis Michaux, Harlem Bookseller written by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson and illustrated by R. Gregory Christie

Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award Winner -  I, Too, Am America written by Langston Hughes and illustrated by Bryan CollierI, Too, Am America, illustrated by Bryan Collier
blank Honor Books: H. O. R. S. E. illustrated and written by Christopher Myers, Ellen’s Broom written by Kelly Starling Lyons and illustrated by Daniel Minter, and I Have a Dream: Martin Luther King, Jr. written by Martin Luther King, Jr. and illustrated by Kadir Nelson

Theodor Seuss Geisel Award Winner – Up, Tall and High written and illustrated by Ethan Long
space Honor Books: Let’s Go for a Drive! written and illustrated by Mo Willems, Pete the Cat and His Four Groovy Buttons written by Eric Litwin and illustrated by James Dean, and Rabbit & Robot: The Sleepover written and illustrated by Cece Bell

Robert F. Sibert Informational Book AwardBomb: The Race to Build—and Steal—the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon written by Steve Sheinkin
space Honor Books: Electric Ben: The Amazing Life and Times of Benjamin Franklin written and illustrated by Robert Byrd, Moonbird: A Year on the Wind with the Great Survivor B95 written by Phillip M. Hoose, and Titanic: Voices from the Disaster written by Deborah Hopkinson

You can find more book award winners if you click here.

Read Full Post »

On Monday, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, we celebrated the Coretta Scott King Book Awards at the Allen County Public Library.  We held a mock election to choose our favorite African American illustrator who published a book in 2012 that demonstrates an appreciation of African American culture and universal human values.  (Those qualities are included in the criteria for the REAL Coretta Scott King Book Award, presented annually for outstanding children’s literature.)  Children voted Kadir Nelson the winner for his work illustrating Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous speech, “I Have A Dream.”  The children most frequently commented that they loved Nelson’s art because it was so “realistic.”

Nelson


Read Full Post »

Included in the awards presented annually to children’s books’ authors and illustrators are the Coretta Scott King Book Awards. They are given to African American authors and illustrators for “outstanding inspirational and educational contributions” which “promote understanding and appreciation of the culture of all peoples and their contribution to the realization of the American dream of a pluralistic society.” You can find a list of past winners here, on the American Library Association website.

This book fits the qualifications and could, in 2013, be on the list of winners. Find our other “nominees” here. If you read an additional new book that you feel is qualified for a Coretta Scott King award, please email so that we may include it in our list. If you have read these titles and want to comment, please do so below. We’d love to hear from you!

fifty cents Fifty Cents and a Dream : Young Booker T. Washington,
by Jabari Asim; illustrated by Bryan Collier
Summary: “Born into slavery, young Booker T. Washington could only dream of learning to read and write. After emancipation, Booker began a five-hundred-mile journey, mostly on foot, to Hampton Institute, taking his first of many steps towards a college degree. When he arrived, he had just fifty cents in his pocket and a dream about to come true.”–book flap

Read Full Post »

Included in the awards presented annually to children’s books’ authors and illustrators are the Coretta Scott King Book Awards. They are given to African American authors and illustrators for “outstanding inspirational and educational contributions” which “promote understanding and appreciation of the culture of all peoples and their contribution to the realization of the American dream of a pluralistic society.” You can find a list of past winners here, on the American Library Association website.

This book fits the qualifications and could, in 2013, be on the list of winners. Find our other “nominees” here. If you read an additional new book that you feel is qualified for a Coretta Scott King award, please email so that we may include it in our list. If you have read these titles and want to comment, please do so below. We’d love to hear from you!

Discovering Black America Discovering Black America: from the age of exploration to the twenty-first century
by Linda Tarrant-Reid
Summary: An unprecedented account of more than 400 years of African-American history set against a background of American and global events. The book includes first-person narratives drawn from diaries, written oral accounts, autobiographies, and interviews.

Read Full Post »

Included in the awards presented annually to children’s books’ authors and illustrators are the Coretta Scott King Book Awards. They are given to African American authors and illustrators for “outstanding inspirational and educational contributions” which “promote understanding and appreciation of the culture of all peoples and their contribution to the realization of the American dream of a pluralistic society.” You can find a list of past winners here, on the American Library Association website.

This book fits the qualifications and could, in 2013, be on the list of winners. Find our other “nominees” here. If you read an additional new book that you feel is qualified for a Coretta Scott King award, please email so that we may include it in our list. If you have read these titles and want to comment, please do so below. We’d love to hear from you!

Hand in Hand Hand in Hand, Ten Black Men Who Changed America
by Andrea Davis Pinkney, Illustrated by Brian J. Pinkney
Summary: “Hand in Hand” presents the stories of 10 men from different eras in American history, organized chronologically to provide a scope from slavery to the modern day. Men profiled include Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Barack H. Obama II.

Read Full Post »

Included in the awards presented annually to children’s books’ authors and illustrators are the Coretta Scott King Book Awards. They are given to African American authors and illustrators for “outstanding inspirational and educational contributions” which “promote understanding and appreciation of the culture of all peoples and their contribution to the realization of the American dream of a pluralistic society.” You can find a list of past winners here, on the American Library Association website.

This book fits the qualifications and could, in 2013, be on the list of winners. Find our other “nominees” here. If you read an additional new book that you feel is qualified for a Coretta Scott King award, please email so that we may include it in our list. If you have read these titles and want to comment, please do so below. We’d love to hear from you!

Discovering Wes Moore Discovering Wes Moore
by Wes Moore
Summary: The author, a Rhodes scholar and combat veteran, analyzes factors that influenced him as well as another man of the name and from the same neighborhood who was drawn into a life of drugs and crime and ended up serving life in prison, focusing on the influence of relatives, mentors, and social expectations that could have led either of them on different paths.

Read Full Post »

Included in the awards presented annually to children’s books’ authors and illustrators are the Coretta Scott King Book Awards. They are given to African American authors and illustrators for “outstanding inspirational and educational contributions” which “promote understanding and appreciation of the culture of all peoples and their contribution to the realization of the American dream of a pluralistic society.” You can find a list of past winners here, on the American Library Association website.

This book fits the qualifications and could, in 2013, be on the list of winners. Find our other “nominees” here. If you read an additional new book that you feel is qualified for a Coretta Scott King award, please email so that we may include it in our list. If you have read these titles and want to comment, please do so below. We’d love to hear from you!

Harlem's Little Blackbird Harlem’s Little Blackbird: the Story of florence Mills
by Renee Watson;
Christian Robinson, illustrator
Summary: Zora and Langston. Billie and Bessie. Eubie and Duke. If the Harlem Renaissance had a court, they were its kings and queens. But there were other, lesser known individuals whose contributions were just as impactful, such as Florence Mills. Born to parents who were former-slaves Florence knew early on that she loved to sing. And that people really responded to her sweet, bird-like voice. Her dancing and singing catapulted her all the way to the stages of 1920s Broadway where she inspired songs and even entire plays! Yet with all this success, she knew firsthand how bigotry shaped her world. And when she was offered the role of a lifetime from Ziegfeld himself, she chose to support all-black musicals instead.

Read Full Post »

Included in the awards presented annually to children’s books’ authors and illustrators are the Coretta Scott King Book Awards. They are given to African American authors and illustrators for “outstanding inspirational and educational contributions” which “promote understanding and appreciation of the culture of all peoples and their contribution to the realization of the American dream of a pluralistic society.” You can find a list of past winners here, on the American Library Association website.

This book fits the qualifications and could, in 2013, be on the list of winners. Find our other “nominees” here. If you read an additional new book that you feel is qualified for a Coretta Scott King award, please email so that we may include it in our list. If you have read these titles and want to comment, please do so below. We’d love to hear from you!

I Have A Dreamby Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.;Illustrated by Kadir Nelson Summary: From Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s daughter, Dr. Bernice A. King: “My father’s dream continues to live on from generation to generation, and this beautiful and powerful illustrated edition of his world-changing “I Have a Dream” speech brings his inspiring message of freedom, equality, and peace to the youngest among us–those who will one day carry his dream forward for everyone.” On August 28, 1963, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington, Martin Luther King gave one of the most powerful and memorable speeches in our nation’s history. His words, paired with Caldecott Honor winner Kadir Nelson’s magificent paintings, make for a picture book certain to be treasured by children and adults alike. The themes of equality and freedom for all are not only relevant today, 50 years later, but also provide young readers with an important introduction to our nation’s past. Included with the book is an audio CD of the speech.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 297 other followers

%d bloggers like this: