Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Jumpstart, an organization dedicated to ensuring that all children in the United States enter school ready to read, is once again sponsoring Read for the Record. During this event last year adults read the same book to 2,462,860 children. Join ACPL as we try to help break that record by sharing Rosemary Wells’ Bunny Cakes with as many children as possible.

Join us at 10:30 at Hessen Cassel, Little Turtle, New Haven, or Waynedale branches or stop by Children’s Services at the Main Library at 2:00 p.m. as we share Bunny Cakes and perhaps some other Max and Ruby stories.

If you’d like to read the story at home, a great organization called We Give Books has Bunny Cakes and many other Max and Ruby stories available to read online on a computer or via an Android device (Flash is needed so iPads and iPhones are out of luck) here. It will also be available for 24 hours on Jumpstart’s website thru Issu. Then head on over to Jumpstart to record your reading! They even have some fun activities to complete after you have read the story.

Since 1996, the nonprofit organization the National Book Foundation has awarded the best in Young People’s Literature with a prize. Each year a new set of five published authors is selected to choose the winners. This year the judges are Sharon M. Draper, Starr LaTronica, Dave Shallenberger, Sherri L. Smith, and Rebecca Stead (click on the names for a link to their books). After reading all of the submissions the judges announce a longlist (in September), finalists (in October), and the winner (in November). Finalists receiving a prize of $1,000, a medal, and a citation from the panel at a private Medal Ceremony and the winner receives $10,000 and a bronze sculpture! Interested in the longlist? Visit the National Book Foundation’s website.

Picture1

Books With Boo!

happy halloween halloween olivia
hedgehug dora  ollie
forest clifford's surprise

Wow! Check out the size of that thing! Have you ever seen a pigeon that big? How do you think it got that big? Would you like to win your own 2 foot tall pigeon? You can!! As part of a learning experience (in classroom, homeschool, afterschool or library program) kids are invited to write a pigeon story and create that story in Legos! You can even use our Legos to do it!

Featured imageACPL Lego® Clubs in October
Georgetown: Wednesdays 3:30-5
Grabill: Wednesday, October 22, 3:30-4:30
Little Turtle: Thursday, October 23, 3:30-4:30
Main: Thursday, October 23, 3:00-4:00
New Haven: Wednesdays, 3:30-5:30
Shawnee: Tuesday, October 21, 4-5
Tecumseh: Tuesday, October 21, 4-5
Waynedale: Wednesday, October 22. 3:30-4:30

More information about “The Pigeon Builds a Story” Contest is available here.

 

The Farmer and the Clown

Marla Frazee has a great new wordless book!

farmer and the clown

space

space

space

space

space

space

space

space

space

space

space

space

This one is going on the 2014 Mock Caldecott Pinterest page soon.

Home.

You know where it is when you’re there.

But sometimes you get a bit separated from home, and you may need a little help finding your way back.

-from the dust jacket

Magnify and Find Out Why

Image from Wikimedia

Image from Wikimedia

Waterbear image from Wikimedia

Waterbear image from Wikimedia

Recently we visited with friends and got a chance to use their digital microscope.  My five-year-old son took to it instantly.  We examined specimen slides of standing water, plant matter, and soil.  There were so many amazing things in the soil!  We were moving around the slide and found a microscopic worm.  We got to watch it wriggle and squirm around.  While following it, we noticed another creature moving around: a waterbear!  I had never heard of these creatures, but apparently they can dry out and remain dessicated for years, then when hydrated they reanimate and come back to life! They look like a prehistoric, microscopic gummy bear with claws. Read more about them at DOGOnews.

My kids were so fascinated with the microscope, I got some information (non-fiction) books so we could read more about magnification. Following a child’s interest helps keep reading fun! It also reinforces that we can use books to find information.  The books can introduce new vocabulary, or even lead you on to a new topic of discovery!

The Georgetown branch also has a tabletop magnifier so kids can explore the bug specimens we have on hand.  It magnifies to 2 times and 7 times the original size, so size and detail comparisons can be made.  We invite you to come check it out!

Guess the Book Part 2!

Here are the answers to yesterday’s post!  Did you guess correctly?

red fish blue fish

the very hungry caterpillar

where the wild things are

LMNO Peas

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 338 other followers

%d bloggers like this: